Monday, March 23, 2020

Proper Prayers for the 5th Sunday in Lent: Year A (29 March 2020)

Proper Prayers for the 5th Sunday in Lent (Year A)


Ezekiel 37.1-14; Psalm 130; Romans 8.6-11; John 11.1-45

                                  

Collect of the Day


Almighty God, your Son came into the world to free us all from sin and death.  Breathe upon us with the power of your Spirit, that/so that we may be raised to new life in Christ, and serve you in holiness and righteousness all our days; through the same Jesus Christ, our Lord.  Amen.  [1]
or
Almighty God, your Son came into the world to free us all from sin and death.  Breathe upon us with the power of your Spirit, that/so that we may be raised to new life in Christ, and serve you in righteousness all our days; through Jesus Christ, our Saviour and Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever.  Amen.  [2]
or
God of compassion, you call us out of the bindings of death on this, our resurrection day:  make us ready to surrender the fear in which we hide to step into your future alive and unashamed; through Jesus Christ, the life of the world.  Amen.  [3]
or
God of all consolation, your Son comforted the grieving sisters, Martha and Mary, for your breath alone brings life to dry bones and weary souls.  Pour out your Spirit upon us, so that we may face despair and death with the hope of the resurrection and faith in the One who called Lazarus forth from the grave.  Amen.
or
Merciful God, you showed your glory to our fallen race by sending your Son to confound the powers of death.  Call us forth from sin’s dark tomb.  Break the bonds which hold us, that/so that we may believe and proclaim Christ, the cause of our freedom and the source of life, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, holy and mighty God for ever and ever.  Amen.  [4 alt.]

Prayer over the Gifts


Giver of life, your Son has destroyed the power of death for all those who believe in him.  Accept all we offer you this day and strengthen us in faith and hope; through Jesus Christ, the Lord of the living.  Amen.  [1]
or
God our provider, you have not fed us with bread alone, but with words of grace and life.  Bless us and these your gifts, which we receive from your bounty, through Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.  [3]

Preface


Blessed are you, gracious God, creator of heaven and earth, because you bid your faithful people to cleanse their hearts and to prepare with joy for the paschal feast; that reborn through the waters of baptism and renewed in the eucharistic mystery, we may be more fervent in prayer and more generous in the works of love.  Therefore we raise our voices to you in praise to proclaim the glory of your name.  [1]
or
It is indeed right, our duty and our joy, that we should at all times and in all places give thanks and praise to you, almighty and merciful God, through our Saviour Jesus Christ.  You call your people to cleanse their hearts and prepare with joy for the paschal feast, that renewed in the gift of baptism, we may come to the fullness of your grace.  And so, with all the choirs of angels, with the church on earth and the hosts of heaven, we praise your name and join their unending hymn:  [2]

Prayer after Communion


God of hope, in this eucharist we have tasted the promise of your heavenly banquet and the richness of eternal life.  May we who bear witness to the death of your Son, also proclaim the glory of his resurrection, for he is Lord for ever and ever.  Amen.  [1]
or
Compassionate God, you have fed us with the bread of heaven.  Sustain us in our Lenten pilgrimage; may our fasting be hunger for justice; our alms, a making of peace; and our prayer, the song of grateful hearts; through Jesus Christ, our Saviour and Lord.  Amen.  [3]

Prayer over the People

In place of a blessing or the Doxology (‘Glory to God whose . . . ‘), a Prayer over the People appropriate to the day may be used.

Look with compassion, O Lord, upon this your people; that, rightly observing this holy season, they may learn to know you more fully, and to serve you with a more perfect will; through Christ our Lord.  Amen.  [7]

Notes


[1]        The Book of Alternative Services 1985
[2]       Evangelical Lutheran Worship 2006
[2a]     Evangelical Lutheran Worship:  Leaders Desk Edition 2006
[3]       Alternative Collects for Years A, B & C of the RCL and Seasonal Prayers over the Gifts and after Communion 2019
[4]        Opening Prayers:  Collects in Contemporary Language 1997
[5]        Prayers for an Inclusive Church 2009
[6]        Revised Common Lectionary Prayers 2002
[7]        Book of Occasional Services 2018

N.B.  Text in italics are possible alternatives suggested by the Ven. Richard Geoffrey Leggett, Ph.D.

Saturday, March 14, 2020

The Lord Is Really with Us: The 3rd Sunday in Lent (15 March 2020)

The Lord Is Really with Us
The 3rd Sunday in Lent

Holy Trinity Anglican Cathedral
New Westminster BC

15 March 2020

Exodus 17.1-7; Psalm 95; Romans 5.1-11; John 4.5-42

Is the Lord really with us?
            On Thursday morning of this past week Archbishop Melissa joined three other faith leaders from the Jewish, Muslim and Sikh communities on CBC Radio One’s ‘Early Edition’ with Stephen Quinn.  They were each interviewed about how their respective communities were responding to the COVID-19 outbreak and what spiritual resources they were bringing to bear.
            One of the leaders spoke about his tradition’s belief that events such as these challenge us to examine our moral and spiritual lives.  In his comments I heard echoes of today’s reading from Exodus.
            The Hebrews had been enslaved in Egypt and through the mighty work of God had been liberated.  They had evaded pursuing armies with God’s help and had had their thirst and hunger satisfied by the providential gifts of manna, quail and water from a stone.  Yet they still muttered to themselves and to Moses, ‘Is the Lord really with us or not?’ [1]
            Hardships of any sort tend to reduce our horizons, whether as individuals or as communities.  We begin to act as if we have been abandoned and lose sight of our primary resource:  God’s persistent and pervasive gracious presence in many and varied ways, seen and unseen.  We often fall into the grip of ingratitude and forget that God, even in our hardships of whatever form, continues to sustain us through the generosity and compassion of our families, our friends and our neighbours.  While no one wishes hardship to come upon anybody, hardship is not a fallow time, a time for personal and communal spiritual growth.

Trouble, Endurance, Character and Hope
            When Paul wrote to the Christian believers in the city of Rome, he was writing at a time of great personal and vocational crisis.  He himself was on the way to Rome for judicial examination, trial and potential execution.  The Roman Christians to whom he was writing were divided by theological partisanship and ethnic conflict.
            Yet, even in this midst of this, Paul writes some of his more memorable prose.
We even take pride in our problems,
because we know that trouble produces endurance,
endurance produces character,
and character produces hope. [2]
Trouble, endurance, character and hope.  What a quartet!  When Paul writes about character, he is thinking of a person who is tried and trusted, some who is a firm as a rock. [3]  For some with character, the hardships of life do not produce na├»ve optimism or fatalism; they produce hope.  Hope springs from looking around us, looking closely at our lives, and seeing how God has been at work in us, around us and, most importantly, for us.

The Lord is really with us.
            She came to the well as she did at least once a day.  How many times had she had to put up with misogyny, sexual innuendo and prejudice?  And so she came and there he was, just one more Jewish male who could indulge in a little bit of Samaritan-bashing and social snobbery.
            But that’s not was happened.  True, there were a few witty remarks exchanged.  But then he touched the depths of her soul and spoke to her heart-felt hopes.  ‘No more waiting for the Messiah,’ he said and she came to believe, ‘I am here.’
            My friends, I will not recite a catalogue of the challenges we face as disciples of Jesus in 21st-century Canada and in this heart of the city of New Westminster.  Nor will I minimize the social, physical and financial hardships COVID-19 has and is likely to continue to impose upon us and many others here and abroad.  But I will tell you this.
            The Lord is really with us, whether we can touch one another or not.  Whether we meet physically in the same space or virtually by means of social media and technology, the Lord is really with us.
            This present trouble comes upon us in the midst of Lent.  During this holy season we seek endurance for our pilgrim journey of faith.  We are building character, becoming more Christ-like as each day brings us closer to the celebration of Christ’s resurrection.  And we grow in up because
[we are] convinced that nothing can separate us 
from God’s love in Christ Jesus our Lord:  
not death nor life, not angels or rulers,
 not present things or future things,
 not powers or height or depth, 
or any other thing that is created. [4]
Not COVID-19.  Not temporary suspensions of our gatherings, whether social or liturgical.  Not anything.  Because the Lord is really with us --- with every human being on this fragile planet of ours.  And when this crisis passes, let us remember this and be thankful.


[1] Exodus 17.7 Common English Bible.

[2] Romans 5.3-4 Common English Bible.

[3] N. T. Wright in “Romans” in The New Interpreter’s Bible 2002, X.516.

[4] Romans 8.38-39 Common English Bible alt.

Wednesday, March 4, 2020

Proper Prayers for the 2nd Sunday in Lent (8 March 2020)

Proper Prayers for the 2nd Sunday in Lent (Year A)


Genesis 12.1-4a; Psalm 121; Romans 4.1-5, 13-17; John 3.1-17

                                  

Collect of the Day


Almighty God, whose Son was revealed in majesty before he suffered death upon the cross, give us faith to perceive his glory, that/so that being strengthened by his grace we may be changed into his likeness, from glory to glory; who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, ow and for ever.  Amen.  [1]
or
O God, our leader and guide, in the waters of baptism you bring us to new birth to live as your children.  Strengthen our faith in your promises, that/so that by your Spirit we may lift up your life to all the world through your Son, our Saviour  and Lord, who lies and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever.  Amen.  [2]
or
Holy God, whose Spirit’s breath prompts our seeking:  transform the night-time of our fear into a welcoming womb for us and all the world; through Jesus Christ, in whom we are born anew.  Amen.  [3]
or
God of mercy, you are full of tenderness and compassion, slow to anger, rich in mercy, and always ready to forgive:  grant us grace to renounce all evil and to cling to Christ, so that in every way we may prove to be your loving children; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.  Amen.  [3]
or
Holy God, during this forty days enlighten your Church with the bright glory of your presence.  Inspire us by your word, and transform us into the image of the risen Lord, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, holy and mighty God for ever and ever.  Amen.  [4 alt.]
or
God of amazing compassion, lover of our wayward race, you bring to birth a pilgrim people, and call us to be a blessing for ourselves and all the world.  We pray for grace to take your generous gift and step with courage on this holy path, confident in the radiant life that is your plan for us, made known and given in Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.  [6]

Prayer over the Gifts


God of wisdom, may the light of the eternal Word, our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ, guide us to your glory.  We ask this in his name.  Amen.  [1]
or
God our provider, you have not fed us with bread alone, but with words of grace and life.  Bless us and these your gifts, which we receive from your bounty, through Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.  [3]

Preface


Blessed are you, gracious God, creator of heaven and earth, because you bid your faithful people to cleanse their hearts and to prepare with joy for the paschal feast; that reborn through the waters of baptism and renewed in the eucharistic mystery, we may be more fervent in prayer and more generous in the works of love.  Therefore we raise our voices to you in praise to proclaim the glory of your name.  [1]
or
It is indeed right, our duty and our joy, that we should at all times and in all places give thanks and praise to you, almighty and merciful God, through our Saviour Jesus Christ.  You call your people to cleanse their hearts and prepare with joy for the paschal feast, that renewed in the gift of baptism, we may come to the fullness of your grace.  And so, with all the choirs of angels, with the church on earth and the hosts of heaven, we praise your name and join their unending hymn:  [2]

Prayer after Communion


Creator of heaven and earth, we thank you for these holy mysteries, which bring us now a share in the life to come, through Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.  [1]
or
Compassionate God, you have fed us with the bread of heaven.  Sustain us in our Lenten pilgrimage; may our fasting be hunger for justice; our alms, a making of peace; and our prayer, the song of grateful hearts; through Jesus Christ, our Saviour and Lord.  Amen.  [3]

Prayer over the People

In place of a blessing or the Doxology (‘Glory to God whose . . . ‘), a Prayer over the People appropriate to the day may be used.

Keep this your family, Lord, with your never-failing mercy, that relying solely on the help of your heavenly grace, they may be upheld by your divine protection; through Christ our Lord.  Amen.   [7]

Notes


[1]        The Book of Alternative Services 1985
[2]       Evangelical Lutheran Worship 2006
[2a]     Evangelical Lutheran Worship:  Leaders Desk Edition 2006
[3]      Alternative Collects for Years A, B & C of the RCL and Seasonal Prayers over the Gifts and after Communion 2019
[4]        Opening Prayers:  Collects in Contemporary Language 1997
[5]        Prayers for an Inclusive Church 2009
[6]        Revised Common Lectionary Prayers 2002
[7]        Book of Occasional Services 2018

N.B.  Text in italics are possible alternatives suggested by the Ven. Richard Geoffrey Leggett, Ph.D.

Saturday, February 29, 2020

Lent Is Not for the Faint-hearted (Lent 1A, 1 March 2020)

Lent Is Not for the Faint-hearted
The First Sunday in Lent

RCL Lent 1A
1 March 2020

Holy Trinity Anglican Cathedral
New Westminster BC

Genesis 2.15-17, 3.1-7; Psalm 32; Romans 5.12-19; Matthew 4.1-11

            Thirty-five years ago The Book of Alternative Services was released and, in many dioceses such as ours, authorized for use along side The Book of Common Prayer.  The BAS, as it is often called, emerged at a time of considerable liturgical anxiety among some segments of the Anglican Church of Canada.  To the south, the Episcopal Church had authorized a new prayer book in 1979 which provided both traditional and contemporary liturgies for morning and evening prayer, the eucharist and several pastoral offices.  Across the Atlantic, the Church of England had authorized an alternative service book in 1980 which was similar to the American prayer book in providing both traditional and contemporary rites.
            Our ‘new’ prayer book was a little more than twenty years old, so it was thought that contemporary alternative services was the route to take.  But in many places parishes were using either American or English services, especially the contemporary ones.  So, despite the concerns of the national committee responsible for the BAS that it was not ‘finished’, the BAS appeared on the shelves of bookstores and in the pews of parishes.
            The problem was that we were now using a three-year cycle of readings and there was only one set of prayers for each Sunday and holy day in the BAS.  At the beginning of the eucharist people heard an opening prayer, what we call a ‘collect’, talking about Abraham or Mary only then to hear readings about Moses or Joseph.  The collect is supposed to ‘collect’ themes or images from the readings and to prepare us for what we are about to hear.
            In 2010, after twenty-five years of complaints, I was appointed chair of a task force to prepare a collection of collects that are based on the three-year cycle of readings we use throughout the Anglican Church of Canada and here at Holy Trinity Cathedral.  I can honestly say it was some of the hardest work I’ve ever undertaken, but I had the privilege of working with a group of colleagues who have become close friends.  I still miss our spirited editorial gatherings, whether in person or by conference call, as we debated words and occasionally punctuation with vigour.
            One of the prayers we considered but did not include in our collection of prayers authorized by General Synod in 2019 is the following:

God of wilderness and water,
your Son was baptized and tempted as we are.
Guide us through this season,
so that we may not avoid struggle,
but open ourselves to blessing,
through the cleansing depths of repentance
and the heaven-rending words of the Spirit.  Amen. [1]

This morning I want to look more closely at the last half of the prayer:  ‘ . . . so that we may not avoid struggle, but open ourselves to blessing, through the cleansing depths of repentance and the heaven-rending words of the Spirit ‘ .

So that we may not avoid struggle but open ourselves to blessing
            All of us gathered today in this Cathedral are aware of a significant struggle taking place in the northern part of our province with echoes throughout the country.  It is a struggle that pits elected band councillors against hereditary chiefs, environmental activists against people who work in the gas and oil industry, the federal government against provincial governments and the pressing questions about reconciliation and justice for indigenous people in this country.  This struggle has been costly:  workers have been laid off, goods have been delayed or have not arrived at their destinations, and communities and families have been divided.
            As so often happens in struggles such as these, simplistic ‘solutions’ to complex issues are proposed, often by people who have, as the saying goes where I grew up, ‘no horse in this race’.  The phrase, ‘the rule of law’, is used as if it has only one interpretation and as if ‘the rule of law’ has been used by governments in Canada and elsewhere in the world to coerce those who oppose governmental policies.  The phrase, ‘no more pipelines’, is used as if many of those using it have not travelled by air or automobile to arrive at protest sites and as if they are not using technology currently dependent upon the plastics and rare earth metals contained in their cellular devices.
            Moral questions rarely if ever are resolved by slogans.  They are resolved by a commitment to informing our consciences through dialogue with those with whom we agree and with whom we disagree. Moral questions often require patience and patience can be costly in time and resources.  But genuine progress is only achieved by participating in the struggle with compassion and patience, with respect and a desire to discern how best to achieve the common good of all.  Only then might we find ourselves open to blessing.

Through the cleansing depths of repentance and the heaven-rending words of the Spirit
            One of my complaints about English translations of the Holy Scriptures is the failure to translate metanoia, a Greek word at the heart of all of today’s readings, properly.  Most often translators use some form of ‘repent’ or ‘repentance’, a word that has its origins in the Latin word meaning ‘punishment’ and is used in one of the words we use in English for a prison, ‘penitentiary’, a place where one is punished for their criminal or civil misdeeds.
            To be sure, I believe that ‘when we fall into sin,’ as the baptismal liturgy puts it, we do suffer.  Sometimes that suffering is emotional and at other times that suffering results in relationships that fall apart or cease to be life-giving.  Sometimes the consequences of our sinful behaviour is so damaging to ourselves and to others that it is almost impossible to imagine how we can start over again.
            What we need at such times is not ‘punishment’ but a new perspective.  That’s what metanoia, the word used in the Greek New Testament, means.  When John the Baptist calls the people to metanoia, he is calling them to look at the world as God sees it and then act appropriately, making the changes that will bring us into proper alignment.  When Jesus invites his disciples into a life of metanoia, he is inviting us to rediscover the image of God within each one of us, an image of love and compassion, and to develop habits of living that embody that love and compassion in our daily lives and work.
            Through the Scriptures, through participation in the worship of the community of faith, through prayer personal and communal, through study and action, the heavens are opened and the Spirit empowers us to become who we truly are, living icons of Christ in a world looking for meaning, often in all the wrong places.

Lent is not for the faint-hearted.
            Every year I begin Lent in the hope that, in the struggle to become more Christ-like, I will be open to the blessing that it would mean to me and to those around me.  Every year I begin Lent in the hope that, in exploring the depths of metanoia, the heavens will be rent open and the Spirit will makes itself present to me in powerful and transformative ways.  But I always enter Lent in the awareness that Lent is not for the faint-hearted.  There is always a cost to the blessing of becoming more Christ-like --- letting go of the comfortable and familiar.  There is always a cost to seeing the world as God sees it --- having my eyes open to the reality of good and evil and my part, our part, in working with God to restore creation.  Yet, such journeys are always worth the cost.


[1] Thematic Seasonal Prayer I for Lent  in Revised Common Lectionary Prayers 2002.

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Propers for the Last Sunday after Epiphany (23 February 2020)

Proper Prayers for RCL Last Sunday after Epiphany


Exodus 24.12-18; Psalm 2 or Psalm 99; 2 Peter 1.16-21; Matthew 17.1-9

                                  

Collect of the Day


Almighty God, on the holy mount you revealed to chosen witnesses your well-beloved Son, wonderfully transfigured:  mercifully deliver us from the darkness of this world, and change us into his likeness from glory to glory; through Jesus Christ our Lord who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, ow and for ever.  Amen.  [1]
or
O God, in the transfiguration of your Son you confirmed the mysteries of the faith by the witness of Moses and Elijah, and in the voice from the bright cloud declaring Jesus your beloved Son, you foreshadowed our adoption as your children.  Make us heirs with Christ of your glory, and bring us to enjoy its fullness, through Jesus Christ, our Saviour and Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever.  Amen.  [2]
or
Compassionate God, you transfigured your Son, Jesus Christ, before the eyes of your chosen witnesses and they were overcome by fear.  Transfigure us so that we may turn from fear to love and reveal your compassion for all humanity; through Jesus Christ, the beloved.  Amen.  [3]
or
Friend of Moses, strength of Elijah, you go with your people and give them your Spirit:  may the Child of your heart transfigure the moral world, so that love may know no bounds; through Jesus Christ, the beloved one.  Amen.  [3]
or
God of glory, it is good for us to be here.  Reveal your Son to us now in the message of the prophets and the witness of the apostles, that/so that we may heed his voice and receive him in faith.  We ask this through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, God for ever and ever.  Amen.  [4]
or
Holy God, mighty and immortal, you are beyond our knowing, yet we see your glory in the face of Jesus Christ, whose compassion illumines the world.  Transform us into the likeness of the love of Christ, who renewed our humanity so that we may share in his divinity, the same Jesus Christ, our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit.  Amen.  [6]
or
O God of the covenant, the cloud of your splendour and the fire of your love revealed your Son on the mountain heights.  Transform our lives in his image, write your law of love on our hearts, and make us prophets of your glory, that/so that we may lead others into your presence; through the same Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, God for ever and ever.  Amen.  [6]

Prayer over the Gifts


Holy God, receive all we offer you this day, and bring us to that radiant glory which we see in the transfigured face of Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.  [1]
or
Holy God, gracious and merciful, you bring forth food from the earth and nourish your whole creation.  Turn our hearts toward those who hunger in any way, so that all may know your care; and prepare us now to feast on the bread of life, Jesus Christ, our Saviour and Lord.  Amen.  [3]
or
God of all creation, all you have made is good, and your love endures forever.  You bring forth bread from the earth and fruit from the vine.  Nourish us with these gifts, so that we might for the world signs of your gracious presence in Jesus Christ, our Saviour and Lord.  Amen.  [3]
or
Blessed are you, O God, maker of all things.  Through your goodness  you have blessed us with these gifts:  our selves, our time and our possessions.  Use us, and what we have gathered, in feeding the world with your love, through the one who gave himself for us, Jesus Christ, our Saviour and Lord.  Amen.  [3]
or
God of mercy and grace, the eyes of all wait upon you,  and you open your hand in blessing.  Fill us with good things at your table, so that we may come to the help of all in need, through Jesus Christ, our redeemer and Lord.  Amen.  [3]
or
Merciful God, as grains of wheat scattered upon the hills were gathered together to become one bread, so let your church be gathered together from the ends of the earth into your kingdom, for yours is the glory through Jesus Christ, now and for ever.  Amen.  [3]

Preface


Blessed are you, gracious God, creator of heaven and earth, because in the mystery of the Word made flesh you have caused a new light to shine in our hearts, to give knowledge of salvation in the face of your Son Jesus Christ our Lord.  Now with angels and archangels and the whole company of heaven, we lift our voices to proclaim the glory of your name.  [1]
or
It is indeed right, our duty and our joy, that we should at all times and in all places give thanks and praise to you, almighty and merciful God, through our Saviour Jesus Christ; who on this day overcame death and the grave, and by his glorious resurrection opened to us the way of everlasting life.  And so, with all the choirs of angels, with the church on earth and the hosts of heaven, we praise your name and join their unending hymn:  [2]

Prayer after Communion


Holy God, we see your glory in the face of Jesus Christ  May we who are partakers of his table reflect his life in word and deed, that/so that all the world may know his power to change and save.  We ask this in his name.  Amen.  [1]
or
We give you thanks, almighty God, that you have refreshed us through the healing power of this gift of life.  In your mercy, strengthen us through this gift, in faith toward you and in fervent love toward one another; for the sake of Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.  [3]
or
O God, we give you thanks that you have set before us this feast, the body and blood of your Son.  By your Spirit strengthen us to serve all in need and to give ourselves away as bread for the hungry, through Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.  [3]
or
God of abundance, with this bread of life and cup of salvation you have united us with Christ, making us one with all your people.  Now send us forth in the power of your Spirit, so that we may proclaim your redeeming love to the world and continue forever in the risen life of Jesus Christ, our Lord.  Amen.  [3]
or
Gracious God, in this meal you have drawn us to your heart, and nourished us at your table with food and drink, the body and blood of Christ.  Now send us forth to be your people in the world, and to proclaim your truth this day and evermore, through Jesus Christ, our Saviour and Lord.  Amen.  [3]
or
O God, our life, our strength, our food, we give you thanks for sustaining us with the body and blood of your Son.  By your Holy Spirit, enliven us to be his body in the world, so that more and more we will give you praise and serve your earth and its many peoples, through Jesus Christ, our Saviour and Lord.  Amen.  [3]

Notes


[1]        The Book of Alternative Services 1985
[2]       Evangelical Lutheran Worship 2006
[2a]     Evangelical Lutheran Worship:  Leaders Desk Edition 2006
[3]       Alternative Collects for Years A, B & C of the RCL and Seasonal Prayers over the Gifts and after Communion 2019
[4]        Opening Prayers:  Collects in Contemporary Language 1997
[5]        Prayers for an Inclusive Church 2009
[6]        Revised Common Lectionary Prayers 2002
[7]        Book of Occasional Services 2003

N.B.  Text in italics are possible alternatives suggested by the Ven. Richard Geoffrey Leggett, Ph.D.

Monday, February 3, 2020

Proper Prayers for the Fifth Sunday after Epiphany (9 February 2020)

Proper Prayers for RCL Epiphany 5A


Isaiah 58.1-9a, (9b-12); Psalm 112.1-9, (10); 1 Corinthians 2.1-12, (13-16); 

Matthew 5.13-20

                                  

Collect of the Day


Merciful Lord, grant to your faithful people pardon and peace, that/so that we may be cleansed from all our sins and serve you with a quiet mind; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who is alive and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever.  Amen.  [1]
or
Lord God, with endless mercy you receive the prayers of all who all upon you.  By your Spirit show us the things we ought to do, and give us the grace and power to do them, through Jesus Christ, our Saviour and Lord.  Amen.  [2]
or
O God of light, your Spirit reveals and illumines your presence in creation.  Shine your radiant holiness into our lives, so that we may offer our hands and hearts to your work: to heal and shelter, to feed and clothe, to break every yoke and silence evil tongues.  Amen.  [3]
or
God of Israel, giver of love’s law:  liberate us from all that numbs compassion, so that we may find in your commands light undimmed and flavour undiminished; through Jesus Christ, fulfiller of the law.  Amen.  [3]
or
Heavenly Father/Giver of life, you have called your Church to be the salt of the earth and the light of the world.  Give us vigorous faith and a love that is genuine, so that all may see our works and give you the glory.  We make our prayer through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, God for ever and ever.  Amen.  [4]

Prayer over the Gifts


God of compassion and forgiveness, receive our offering this day, and make us one with him who is our peace, Jesus Christ our Saviour.  Amen.  [1]
or
Holy God, gracious and merciful, you bring forth food from the earth and nourish your whole creation.  Turn our hearts toward those who hunger in any way, so that all may know your care; and prepare us now to feast on the bread of life, Jesus Christ, our Saviour and Lord.  Amen.  [3]
or
God of all creation, all you have made is good, and your love endures forever.  You bring forth bread from the earth and fruit from the vine.  Nourish us with these gifts, so that we might for the world signs of your gracious presence in Jesus Christ, our Saviour and Lord.  Amen.  [3]
or
Blessed are you, O God, maker of all things.  Through your goodness  you have blessed us with these gifts:  our selves, our time and our possessions.  Use us, and what we have gathered, in feeding the world with your love, through the one who gave himself for us, Jesus Christ, our Saviour and Lord.  Amen.  [3]
or
God of mercy and grace, the eyes of all wait upon you,  and you open your hand in blessing.  Fill us with good things at your table, so that we may come to the help of all in need, through Jesus Christ, our redeemer and Lord.  Amen.  [3]
or
Merciful God, as grains of wheat scattered upon the hills were gathered together to become one bread, so let your church be gathered together from the ends of the earth into your kingdom, for yours is the glory through Jesus Christ, now and for ever.  Amen.  [3]

Preface


Blessed are you, gracious God, creator of heaven and earth; you are the source of light and life for all your creation, you made us in your own image, and call us to new life in Jesus Christ our Saviour.  Therefore we praise you, joining our voices to proclaim the glory of your name.  [1]
or
Blessed are you, gracious God, creator of heaven and earth; we give you thanks and praise through Jesus Christ our Lord, who on this first day of the week overcame death and the grave, and by his glorious resurrection opened to us the way of everlasting life.  In our unending joy we echo on earth the song of the angels in heaven as we raise our voices to proclaim the glory of your name.  [1]
or
Blessed are you, gracious God, creator of heaven and earth; by water and the Holy Spirit you have made us a holy people in Jesus Christ our Lord; you renew that mystery in bread and wine and nourish us, to show forth your glory in all the world.  Therefore with angels and archangels, and with all the holy people who have served you in every age, we raise our voices to proclaim the glory of your name.  [1]
or
It is indeed right, our duty and our joy, that we should at all times and in all places give thanks and praise to you, almighty and merciful God, through our Saviour Jesus Christ; who on this day overcame death and the grave, and by his glorious resurrection opened to us the way of everlasting life.  And so, with all the choirs of angels, with the church on earth and the hosts of heaven, we praise your name and join their unending hymn: [2]

Prayer after Communion


Eternal God, in you we find peace beyond all telling.  May we who share in this heavenly banquet be instruments of your peace on earth, in the name of Jesus Christ the Lord.  Amen.  [1]
or
We give you thanks, almighty God, that you have refreshed us through the healing power of this gift of life.  In your mercy, strengthen us through this gift, in faith toward you and in fervent love toward one another; for the sake of Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.  [3]
or
O God, we give you thanks that you have set before us this feast, the body and blood of your Son.  By your Spirit strengthen us to serve all in need and to give ourselves away as bread for the hungry, through Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.  [3]
or
God of abundance, with this bread of life and cup of salvation you have united us with Christ, making us one with all your people.  Now send us forth in the power of your Spirit, so that we may proclaim your redeeming love to the world and continue forever in the risen life of Jesus Christ, our Lord.  Amen.  [3]
or
Gracious God, in this meal you have drawn us to your heart, and nourished us at your table with food and drink, the body and blood of Christ.  Now send us forth to be your people in the world, and to proclaim your truth this day and evermore, through Jesus Christ, our Saviour and Lord.  Amen.  [3]
or
O God, our life, our strength, our food, we give you thanks for sustaining us with the body and blood of your Son.  By your Holy Spirit, enliven us to be his body in the world, so that more and more we will give you praise and serve your earth and its many peoples, through Jesus Christ, our Saviour and Lord.  Amen.  [3]

Notes


[1]        The Book of Alternative Services 1985
[2]       Evangelical Lutheran Worship 2006
[2a]     Evangelical Lutheran Worship:  Leaders Desk Edition 2006
[3]       Alternative Collects for Years A, B & C of the RCL and Seasonal Prayers over the Gifts and after Communion 2019
[4]        Opening Prayers:  Collects in Contemporary Language 1997
[5]        Prayers for an Inclusive Church 2009
[6]        Revised Common Lectionary Prayers 2002
[7]        Book of Occasional Services 2003

N.B.  Text in italics are possible alternatives suggested by the Ven. Richard Geoffrey Leggett, Ph.D.